Cynthia Wagner's blog

The Technologies of Well-Being: About the May-June FUTURIST

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Though some may argue that we rely too heavily on technofixes for all our problems, a variety of technological developments are in fact improving medicine and therapeutics, our health and overall physical well-being, and even our sex lives. But the authors in this issue suggest that one of the most important “breakthroughs” in medicine may be better communications and stronger partnerships between doctors and patients.

About the March-April 2014 FUTURIST

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Learning from Our Mistakes

Things don’t always work out as we hope or plan. Take the Information Revolution, for example. When the Internet was rolled out, that Information Superhighway was supposed to open a global supermarket where everyone could sell more stuff to everyone else. We would all become more knowledgeable, thanks to free, open Web-based encyclopedias and resources, and we could all become famous authors without hassling with picky editors and publishers.

Editor’s Call for Essays: Futures Education

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If you have taught, administered, or participated in a futuring course or program, THE FUTURIST magazine would like to hear from you! For its September-October 2014 issue, THE FUTURIST will compile articles, essays, and resources on the teaching and learning of futurism.

About the January-February 2014 FUTURIST

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Best Predictions of the Year (and the Worst)

In the last issue of THE FUTURIST, the annual Outlook report offered a roundup of the year’s best forecasts appearing in our magazine. In this issue, we see what nonfuturists had to say about the future during 2013.

Futurist Parker Rossman (1919-2013)

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We were saddened to learn of the death of longtime World Future Society supporter Parker Rossman, an educator and early proponent of the global electronically networked knowledge society. He died on October 18 at the age of 94. (Read: Obituary courtesy of Parker Funeral Service.)

Rossman's work had been featured in THE FUTURIST magazine for a quarter of a century, from 1981 to 2006. Here is a transcript of his last feature article, "Beyond the Book," published in the January-February 2005 issue.

Connectivity and Its Discontents: About the November-December 2013 FUTURIST

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One of the concepts that futurists have been buzzing more about in recent years is the Internet of Things—the idea that interactive communication will extend beyond people and organizations to include objects communicating with each other. For instance, sensors buried on water pipelines would notify a city’s sanitation department if a leak may be imminent.

Case of the Disappearing Future: About the September-October Futurist

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They say you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone, but I’m more inclined to think the opposite is true: out of sight, out of mind. I am often startled when the landline phone on my desk rings, and then the caller wants to fax something to me. Fax? Do we still have a machine for that? Where is it?

Hot Futures in Chicago!

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It's great to be back in Chicago (as hot as it is) for another WorldFuture conference. This year we set our eyes on "the next horizon," the twenty-second century.

About the July-August FUTURIST

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Preview of Things to Come in July! A WorldFuture Sneak Peek. For this issue of THE FUTURIST, we invited several of our 2013 conference participants to offer us a preview of their forthcoming presentations at WorldFuture 2013: Exploring the Next Horizon:

Of Buggy Whips and BetaMax

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Editor's Query: Disappearing Futures. What is likely to be here today and gone tomorrow? Many things we once thought we couldn't live without are now hard to find even in antique shops. And not just "things," but institutions, values, resources, diseases, languages, and people have all come and gone from our lives.

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